Frank Stella Black Paintings & Minimalist Art

After watching this video on Frank Stella Black Paintings & Minimalist Art, you might be wondering what his work looked like post- black painting? What could you possibly make after such parred down, minimalist painting?

Frank Stella's 'Harran II', 1967. Polymer and fluorescent polymer paint on canvas
Frank Stella's 'Harran II', 1967. Polymer and fluorescent polymer paint on canvas

Well, I'll have you know that he didn't stay in this phase. He went on to various printmaking techniques, furthered the sculptural aspects of his canvases (which he came to call "maximalist" paintings). He began to work with irregularly shaped canvases in his Eccentri Polygon series, introduced elements of collage and pasted pieces of canvas onto plywood. They became more three-dimensional, to a point where he started making large, free-standing metal pieces, where, although he would continue to paint on them, they would pretty much become sculptures altogether.

Frank Stella, Chodorow II (Side View). Photo: Cliff1066
Frank Stella, Chodorow II (Side View). Photo: Cliff1066

Frank Stella, Chodorow II. Photo: Cliff1066
Frank Stella, Chodorow II. Photo: Cliff1066

By the 1970s and 1980s, his work became more elaborate and exuberant. His earlier Minimalist work faded to the back burner compared to the curved forms, Day-Glo colors (aka Blacklight paint) and painterly brushstrokes.


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